xPain Is Salvationx

Tosh, 22, Mexico City. Tiny brown man.
Vocals for Break The Constant.
Management and bussiness administration student.
My heart belongs to Jesuschrist.


I do not own any of the pictures I have uploaded/posted/reblogged unless stated so.
If you do see something that is yours please tell me and I will credit you.

I TRACK THE TAG "xtoshconstantx".


KIK? Yes, ask for it privately.  

Instagram: xtoshconstantx

brutalgeneration:

Glass Cloud (by Kyle Kotajarvi)

brutalgeneration:

Glass Cloud (by Kyle Kotajarvi)

Reblogged from: thefartismurder via posted by: brutalgeneration
callingallcaptainsband:

lookatmeimafake:

welcumer:

A Day To Remember

I don’t care what you say, this is the greatest thing a go pro has ever filmed.

eeppiiiccc

callingallcaptainsband:

lookatmeimafake:

welcumer:

A Day To Remember

I don’t care what you say, this is the greatest thing a go pro has ever filmed.

eeppiiiccc

Reblogged from: feelthelifeinblue via posted by: welcumer
joelpilotte:

Luke Kilpatrick of Parkway DriveBonner Springs, KSJuly 31st, 2014
www.joelpilotte.com

joelpilotte:

Luke Kilpatrick of Parkway Drive
Bonner Springs, KS
July 31st, 2014

www.joelpilotte.com

Reblogged from: counterrparts via posted by: joelpilotte

(Source: calebmacintyre)

Reblogged from: counterrparts via posted by: calebmacintyre
I kinda liked my hair today. 😊

I kinda liked my hair today. 😊

Reblogged from: sleepyncreepy via posted by: luxuryera

(Source: kinkysexywife)

Reblogged from: iamrickyhoover via posted by: kinkysexywife
strangevibezz:

That’s meee

strangevibezz:

That’s meee

Reblogged from: losttinmythoughts via posted by: strangevibezz
gifbaskets:


Blink 182 - Take Off Your Pants and Jacket

gifbaskets:

Blink 182 - Take Off Your Pants and Jacket

Reblogged from: tomdelongestpenisever via posted by: gifbaskets

sicluceatluxvestra:

The Dyatlov Pass Incident (the true version, not a creepypasta) 

The Dyatlov Pass Incident was real and occurred in February of 1959. A team of ski hikers, organized by Igor Alekseievich Dyatlov (whom the area is now named after) went for a ski trek across the Northern Ural Mountains in Russia. Most of the team were students or graduates of Ural Polytechnical Institute (Уральский Политехнический Институт, УПИ) and consisted of eight men and two women:

  • Igor Alekseievich Dyatlov (Игорь Алексеевич Дятлов) -age 23
  • Zinaida Alekseevna Kolmogorova (Зинаида Алексеевна Колмогорова) – age 24
  • Lyudmila Alexandrovna Dubinina (Людмила Александровна Дубинина) – age 21
  • Alexander Sergeievich Kolevatov (Александр Сергеевич Колеватов) – age 25
  • Rustem Vladimirovich Slobodin (Рустем Владимирович Слободин) – age 23
  • Yuri Alexeievich Krivonischenko (Юрий Алексеевич Кривонищенко) – age 24
  • Yuri Nikolaievich Doroshenko (Юрий Николаевич Дорошенко) – 21
  • Nicolai Vladimirovich Thibeaux-Brignolles (Николай Владимирович Тибо-Бриньоль) – age 24
  • Semyon (Alexander) Alexandrovich Zolotariov (Семен (Александр) Александрович Золотарёв) – age 38

The team set out from Vizhai, Siberia on January 27th, 1959. The goal of the expedition was to reach Otorten (Отортен) Mountain. At the time of the year they were trekking, the hike was rated at it’s highest difficulty, but all members of the team were experienced climbers and hikers and they proceeded with little difficulty until the snow came.

 Between January 31st and February 1st the team began moving through what would become known as Dyatlov Pass. They had begun climbing up into the mountains from the forest but snowstorms were decreasing their visibility and they were gradually taken off course to the west. Instead of backtracking and climbing back down into the forest for better shelter from the snows, Dyatlov had the team set up camp moutain side.

 Dyatlov and his team were expected to send a telegram confirming their successful climb by February 12th which was, of course, never received. Due to this circumstances, on February 20th, the first search party was sent out.

 Until finally, on February 26th, the camp was found, along with the first five bodies.

Searchers found the site in ruins. The tent had collapsed and was filled with snow. The most curious thing was that it had been cut open and coats and other protective gear had all been left behind. They found footprints of people without shoes and most without socks. The tent appeared to have been cut open from the inside, which led to the conclusion that they had been buried by a monsterous avalanche during the night and had to cut their way out of the tent, running away in whatever they happened to be wearing at the time. Temperatures in the zone at that time of the year are in between −25 to −30 °C (−13 to −22 °F).

 Yuri Nikolaievich Doroshenko and Yuri Alexeievich Krivonischenko were found at a makeshift camp down in the forest in front of a burnt out fire.

 Three others; Dyatlov, Kolmogorova and Slobodin were found several hundred meters further and it appeared as if they may have been trying to get back to the tent when they had frozen to death.

 It took over two months to find the remaining four bodies. They were under four meters of snow seventy five meters from the other bodies in a ravine. They were found to be wearing some of the clothes of their teammates who had died first in an attempt to stay warm. Three had suffered fatal injuries. Two had skull fractures and another had chest fractures. It is speculated that the injuries were inflicted when they had fallen into the ravine and not from being attacked by a native Mansi tribe as had been originally postulated. The bodies were all well preserved from the cold temperatures. Dubinia had suffered the most post mortem decay, losing her eyes and tongue and lips.

An official investigation was launched and for the most part it was conclusively determined that the avalanche theory was the most coherent. Although a very interesting part of this whole story is that several articles of clothing from the victims were found to be carrying high levels of radiation. It has been established that Dyatlov Pass had taken the team right between two military testing areas of the Russian army: One for the intercontinental R-7 missiles and the other for nuclear bomb tests, which originated a new theory that said they had gotten too close to a classified experiment and were, as a consecuence, killed by military forces. This theory, however, was proven false later as no tracks were ever found around the camp or any of the bodies aside from the victims themselves.

Over the years people have wanted desperately to make this something more than what it is. A yeti attack or some other supernatural occurrence is the most popular aside from the usual military conspiracy theory coverup, originating myths and internet “creepypastas” in which they were attacked by cannibal mutants or native mountain tribes, among several others. They were buried in an avalanche in the middle of the night and with their shelter clothes and equipment soaked and ruined, they had nothing to do but try to make new ones and stay warm; which makes it already a situation too horrifying to live in the flesh, and even worse than any other the internet has been able to come up with.

  1. Rescuers find the original campsite with the tent collapsed.
  2. Rescuers digging up the snow in a later succesful attempt to recover the bodies.
  3. Komolgorova’s frostbitten corpse.
  4. Dead bodies laying in the snow.
  5. Dyatlov’s frozen remains.
  6. Corpses found at the ravine. Dubinia’s face shows signs of decay in the eye and mouth areas.
  7. Death by hypothermia.

Follow my side blog if you’re into this kind of stuff and more on the same line!

Reblogged from: sicluceatluxvestra via posted by: sicluceatluxvestra